Cool Kid Indicators: Thanks, Evan Hennessy, for adding to the list.

Yesterday I wrote about some of the ways Millenials view the world differently and how that shift in values will translate into a different physical environment.  It was far from an exhaustive list.

Cincyopolis friend, Evan Hennessy, lives in Over-the-Rhine and is deeply committed to its future. He was kind enough to share my post on his Facebook newsfeed and pointed out an important trend I had missed:

“Cool kids care about the fact that the child poverty rate in their city hovers around 50% and that it doesn’t need to. They care that as the cost of living increases in the ‘core’ neighborhoods a good portion of the original residents are finding themselves priced out and they don’t need to be. They recognize the fact that this old, rust belt, Midwestern city they’ve chosen to call home, has seen some pretty hard times and that any sudden rising tide should lift ALL boats. And most importantly they realize that they are living in a pretty unique City that has the capacity to do great things and be a model for others.”

To all you cynics who refer to OTR as “only the rich” – let me assure you, Evan is wonderful, but he is not the exception to the rule.  The social conscience of this generation runs deep, they live the ideal of the “sharing economy” and their new way of defining success is the bottom-line reason I am so absolutely, positively sure about the future of my city.

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One thought on “Cool Kid Indicators: Thanks, Evan Hennessy, for adding to the list.

  1. Travis Estell

    I roll my eyes when I hear people stereotype urbanists and/or millennials as people who “expect all this fancy stuff like Red Bikes and streetcars and want ‘gentrification’ in OTR and don’t care about the neighborhood at all”. That could not be further from the truth. The reason why we support redevelopment in the city is because we want to preserve the architecture and the history of the neighborhood. The reason why we love OTR is because of the diversity and culture, and the last thing we would ever want is for it to become a homogenous playground for middle class white people. The reason we support the streetcar is because it will drive economic development, adding new businesses and residents to the city and helping our city get out of the red and into the black financially, which will benefit every single neighborhood in the city.

    Reply

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